Wednesday, August 21, 2013

Perspective, Courtesy Orson Welles

I think about the moment at the 1:30 mark of this clip a lot. Whenever I have regrets about how I've managed my career or how hard I've worked or how many hours I've spent on a treadmill, I think of this clip.
In my case, the old man wouldn't say, "You always just used money to..." He would say, "What have you done with your life? You've used it just to..." And I would interrupt, "to enjoy it". "To surround myself with people I love and who love me and just... enjoy it."
Thanks for the comforting little piece of this scene that lives on in the back of my brain, Orson.
I did not post this video. Whoever did so has my thanks, particularly for the appropriate title.


Saturday, August 10, 2013

Inking Made Easy

I published this on Twitter the other day. Figured I might as well place it here, too.
Here, in my semi-humble opinion, is what makes good comic book inking, in five not-so-easy steps:

1- Draw, don't trace. You don't have to be Frazetta, but you have to know what the forms are and how to contribute to them. Always.
2- Make confident lines. We don't want to see you tentatively feeling your way around. Make every line like you know it's the right line.
3- Vary line weights. If all your line weights are the same the work will be flat. Fat, bold lines next to razor thin lines makes stuff POP.
4- Texture. Develop & consistently apply visual shorthand for textures. Complex or simple, they must be convincing. Wood, steel, cloth, etc.
5- Saved the most important for last. Help tell the story! Spot blacks. Separate visual planes. Keep things clear. Story > pretty lines.

There. Now you can all go be brilliant inkers and take all the jobs. I don't care anymore. I'm a writer! #alleged